Favorite Tweets 2012

December 31st, 2012 llcowell Posted in micro blog | No Comments »

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Media Literacy Appeal

January 11th, 2012 llcowell Posted in literacy, LiteracyRemix, media, uncategorized | No Comments »

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Favorite Tweets 2011

December 31st, 2011 llcowell Posted in micro blog | No Comments »

  • Migrating a webpage is so time consuming. Hard to find the time alongside instructional needs. #
  • Must read research for the data heads… http://t.co/3eRP82C … while not surprising, enlightening! #
  • MetaGame, and ideas for using in the classroom available at metaga.me #gls7 #
  • Moving games forward WITH other digital media…? how do we merge these conversations… #gls7 #
  • Get ready 2 …Prepare to parent, close early lit gaps, 4 healthy kids, girls in STEM careers, activate global prob solving #gls7 #
  • Digital Teacher Corp…project to prepare teaches or the new learning community by mobilizing a corps of teacher leaders. #gls7 #
  • Games that address national core standard on the horizon…. #gls7 #
  • Great point…Need to norm children’s use of digital media around developmentally appropriate activities… #gls7 #
  • Can’t reposition games for learning without looking at challenges to creating effective digital media…. #gls7 #
  • Key point…school isn’t the only place kids learn! #gls7 … but sometimes where they stop learning :(  #
  • Modern family economy = connect what is going on at home across the “moat” of school. #gls7 #
  • stem video w kids talking about their game design would be a powerful prof dev tool in schools. I want to show it to my HS teachers! #gls7 #
  • Filament’s You Make Me Sick http://t.co/w6yZ7ah #
  • COONEY Center reports http://t.co/89OeR8c #gls7 #
  • Coney reports here http://t.co/89OeR8c #gls7 #
  • Coney center reports here http://t.co/89OeR8c #gls7 #
  • Again…awesome lunch, and Keynote meaningful! Cooney Center Games and Learning Initiatives. #gls7 #
  • Love the driving analogy…GREAT discussion. #gls7 #
  • “collaborative literacy” as in “collaborative knowledge” as opposed to common knowledge. #
  • adapt tools 4 assess 1 “art form” 2 another as literacy assessment model? yes! Cross pollinate 2 deal w RAPID emergence of new forms #gls7 #
  • Collective narrative…collective knowing…collective learning…really a new field of understanding we are just touching on. #gls7 #
  • Via Constance…if a gamer is a new kind of reader…what do we know about this process. Exciting new area of study. #gls7 #
  • Further study will be done on how imposed query differs from natural query practices. #gls7 #
  • Students often did not believe their own search strategies were the best strategies…#gls7 #
  • Students respond very differntly ton Imposed query than voluntary query. Push back! #gls7 #
  • Simultaneous not sequential (figure out who to ask) more complex info seeking process…#gls7 #
  • Call and response (answer) call and refer (where to find) call and avalanche (lots of answers coming in) #gls7 #
  • Type of info exchanged 1) how to manipulate environment 2) directional #gls7 #
  • Chat log = seeking and quick dissemination of information…too distracting otherwise. #gls7 #
  • Focused on info literacy process (seeking, finding, evaluative, etc.) #gls7 #
  • Online reading skills different than print based text…#gls7 #
  • Designing Computer Games into Books with 6th Grade Partners…#gls7 #
  • Would be interesting to read more research on how students read comics. #gls7 #
  • Interesting…they spent more time on the game (engagement?) but learned the same. #gls7 #
  • Capture was more difficult with DS, due to technical issues. #gls7 #
  • In comic book, kids did not look at images, just tracked text. In DS game, they looked at graphics as well. #gls7 #
  • Comic book was on screen…wonder if screen has any impact on reading…#gls7 #
  • Eye track compared comic book v. adventure game (parallel graphics)…#gls7 #
  • No significant difference in detail learning between traditional text, comic, and adventure game style reading #gls7 #
  • Presentation focusing on focus in multimodal reading (eye tracking research). #gls7 #
  • Presented last session as @hattiebb (private me)…a few of my students might find that tombe “news” #
  • Hmmm…will my Tweetdeck crash again today? #
  • “@mridley: Copyright scare tactics unlikely to deter Cdn educational institutions: they’re moving to a new model http://t.co/qEHxxs8” #gls7 #
  • #gls7 one last day to soak it in…much to take home…and a whole summer to play with it. It love the timing of the conf this year. #
  • “@infodiva: Mobile devices erode traditional gaming space (video) – CNET News:http://t.co/EdyciAh” #gls7 #
  • RT @cooneycenter: Can digital games be used to measure kids’ learning? Yes! And parents want to be involved. http://bit.ly/lPxJFN #gls7 #
  • RT @MindShiftKQED: Figuring out copyright laws for content used in classroom is a major headache for educators.
    http://ow.ly/58YHv #gls7 #
  • RT @MindShiftKQED: Games, gadgets, the cloud: coming soon to a school near you
    http://ow.ly/5f9TO #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • RT @MindShiftKQED: iCivics, Classroom Inc + get $7 million in grants to boost college readiness.
    http://ow.ly/5hQOa #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • RT @MindShiftKQED: 5 reasons why video games power up learning.http://ow.ly/5iyZG @mediatwit #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Ap Dev using Buzztouch.com looks interesting #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • RT @brainpicker: The evolution of workstyle, in an infographichttp://j.mp/kjDS3R #gls7 #
  • RT @brainpicker: Book artists who work on a tiny scale – amazinghttp://j.mp/lMVUpP (via @michaelnobbs). PLAYFUL! #
  • RT @fastcompany: Double Impact Gamifies Saving The Planet, Makes Giving To Charity Free http://bit.ly/lI2lTw #gls7 #
  • Xcode templates that you can get going by simply changing variables… #
  • Although dont have 2 code App, comforting that it reads so logically that laymen can recognize the patterns and read. #
  • Xcode is based in object oriented programming…much more intuitive. #gls7#nmc11 #
  • Developer account gets you Xcode and access to sample code. Presenter recommends SAMS iPhone development guide. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Will you brand to institution or to self as individual teacher? Consider legal issues per App #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Register as a developer…don’t really need to pay the $99 until you are ready to distribute…let’s you play. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Attending “Aps to Go, No Coding Required” #
  • Participant questions loss of ability to go back through and highlight, underline. Use VideoANT! #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Different grammar at work makes it different to teach… #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Digital essay can be more rigorous in terms of layers… #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • New ways of knowing = scholarship! #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • So, do we need to make greater efforts to RECOGNIZE the rigor, rather than IMPOSE it ? #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Social networking globally gives them new/ unexpected data sets ot available to students just one generation ago. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Ethnographic approach=True scholarship’ original research. Agree! #
  • Students have access (as citizen journalist?) that pros don’t…may = new insights we aren’t accustom to seeing in academics #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • The personal nature of the devices they use & their ubiquitous access to technology naturally makes approach more personal… #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Good thought…inclusion of people farther afield (secondary) makes it more rigorous, more “valid.” #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • What is different? Egocentric … Interview people they know. Hmmm…more primary info than secondary. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • So is digital essay a NEW genre of writing/authorship? #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Rhetorical essay is professionally produced while digital essay is “mass tech” by non-traditional authors… #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Labs (or workshops, or studio time) with coaches helps reduce cognitive load. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • If cognitive load is high (new technical skills) the content area suffers. #gls7#nmc1 #
  • What PD prepares content area teacher have collaborative conversations…some threat to their own position of expertise. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Meta conversation needs to take place when technologist and content area teacher are collsborative planning media project. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Showing good example (Shama) alongside script…helps student understand the interplay between text and visual/aural elements, #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Voice over becomes the expository writing…musical elements set some mood/ again evoking reaction… #
  • Consider Shama’s Power of Art series…opening questions, visuals that immediately engage viewer to THINK…evoke connection #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Digital essays are more than a hybrid of written essay and documentary or rhetorical film… #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Formative assignments –>Responsive writing to stills, audio assignment, production training. #gls7 #nmc11 is this enough? #
  • What is the intersection between academic essay–>digital essay–>rhetorical film?
    #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • What strategies and structures are used to deliver the argument? #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • IOW Rhetorical film is noT narrative (digital storytelling) #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Intersection between essay and rhetoric film…argument, thesis, new knwlg, evidence based, NOT story driven. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Rhetorical film (Bordwell & Thompson)…equiv of Research Essay…just higher tech. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Critical writing properties 4essay = thesis, organization, form (depending on purpose).
    #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • If writing is thought made visible, what is digital comp? #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Write a research paper / essay implies a proces( at least for teacher)…”make a video” implications ar not clear. #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • 1996–>2011 Digital composition moves from Comm Arts to cross-curricular… #gls7 #nmc2011 #
  • Attending digital essays…opportunity 2 support AP Writing/Comp teacher in refining end of year video “free-4-all” project. #nmc11 #gls7 #
  • Popcorn JS posts text and other media alongside video! credits with bib citation! #nmc11 #gls7 #
  • Use Internet Archive as a place to PUBLISH remix that is clearly fair use (YouTube doesn’t recognize fair use!) #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Students need to ask themselves these “appropriateness” questions in order to keep remix effective. Break the mores only purposely! #
  • Getting mighty tired of iPad tweetdeck closing after each tweet! #
  • What is is rhetorically appropriate? How do connotations effect this? Hw do institutions effect this? #
  • “witnessing ton the process of witnessing itself” … Compelled to act, not simply watch…remix #Gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Yes…real literacy in authoring can’t be achieved until adept at reading those same texts. Includes remix http://t.co/7Bjne2G #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • http://scalar.usc.edu/anvc/kuhn/iraqi-doctors-on-the-front-lines-of-medicinehighlights us of remix w/ academic rigor #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Remix as research based digital arguements…going beyond the bells and whistle #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Ways of Seeing was a BBC video prior to book! Unusual iteration…. #gls7 #nmc11#
  • filmic texts and the rise of the fifth estate (cent pub) #gls7 #nmc11 #
  • Attending “Remix: Critical strategies for t&l with video archives. #gl7 #
  • Excited to take this opportunity to attend some breakout sessions at the NMC Summer Cnfr #
  • RT @mashabletech: Send Multiple iPhone Pics in One Digital Postcard with Photogram - http://on.mash.to/kDFeI1 #
  • Gaming education (via Amplify) http://amplify.com/u/a15ce8 #
  • Activate is available here: http://tinyurl.com/3c6lu6g #
  • Excited about this concept (Activate) as a way of implementing a purposeful “gaming club” at school. #gls7 #
  • Next they’ll be trying a workshop with game design sessions interrelated with “service learning” activities during other sessions. #gls7 #
  • Worth looking at gender differences in response to Activate approach…and how splitting up the genders effects outcomes…. #gls7 #
  • Use a “grow a game” deck to ideate other options. #gls7 Now web based at Tiltfactor, #gls7 #
  • interesting….Q: “board game based approach might speed up iteration?” #gls7Answ: paper/pencil tends to make it “math like.” #gls7 #
  • Method: break the game (system) in order to learn how to build or fix it. #gls7 #
  • Q?posed: Does (Acitvate) have similar methods 4 teaching complex skills needed for troubleshooting? Answ: Lots of facilitators. #gls7 #
  • Interesting: beyond just programming to understanding “game rules” #gls7 #
  • “personification helps in filling in the gap” when thinking about the actions and complete system. #gls7 #
  • Reminds me of when I learned PS, needed that physical demo of layers before it “clicked” for me. #gls7 #
  • Mix of physical activities and computer activities spreads the energy out and meets the needs of a variety of learning stlyes. #gls7 #
  • WOW! The physical play really reinforced the concept for me! #gls7 #
  • Start w/ natural language, letting student “guess” at what the word might be prior to identifying the correct work (i.e. collision). #gls7 #
  • 1st students are taught some basic syntax (logic) and terminology. #gls7 #
  • Sprites define object ability? #gls7 #
  • sprite–>object–>event–triggers “action” ??? I’m anxious so see if the physical helps my mind grasp this. I’m no programmer. #gls7 #
  • This is right on SO many levels! #gls7 #
  • Bridging the gap for kinesthetic learners…helping them to undersand what’ going on in software with a physical model (bodies). #gls7 #
  • Modeling systems thinking physically activates student understanding of how the software (gamemaker) works. #gls7 #
  • Activategames.org curriculum designed for in-school after school programs #gls7#
  • Smithsonian MIT project backbone will be open source, available soon. #gls7Significantly cuts replication costs. #
  • RT @ShellTerrell: A post I wrote about using games to get students learning English in the summer http://bit.ly/mdFOdZ #eltchat #gls7 #
  • RT @mashable: Could Game Mechanics Turn Work Into Play? [INFOGRAPHIC] -http://on.mash.to/jJl7QZ #gls7 #
  • Chu’s key arguements about museum space games = short and simple, broad audience, multiple players, learning by doing #gls7 #
  • Makes me wonder how we might employ games that allow users 2 attach mobile devices (iPad) 2 local server to play interactively #gls7 #
  • computer/competitive games are inexpensive. Many of us have the computers and servers already in space. #gls7 #
  • “Spy Party” engages two players (two screens) each engaged individually. #gls7 #
  • RT @LibraryRemix: How do we design games that engage all visitors (or groups of visitors? Collaborative learning? #gls7 #
  • People visit museums in groups or pairs…so when we have a game, risk one person “doing” the exhibit and others watching. #gls7 #
  • Non-gamers don’t have certain “gaming” literacies we might assume. #gls7 #
  • Target audience…tricky to design for non-gamers. #gls7 #
  • RT @charlesj: Boy scout patches are achievements aren’t they? #gls7 True.. So badge collection appeals to the younger, more “playful” me. #
  • Science museums are phenomena based and suited to quick, casual games. #gls7 #
  • “Games in museums need to be more casual than casual games.” Chu #
  • Could extended play element keep player’s engaged for deeper learning? Or enrich learning? Or individualize learning? #gls7 #
  • Considering these embedded games, I have to wonder about augmenting (or continuing) the experience online (or in a take-away) #gls7 #
  • 1990, Semper “A museum is an educational county fair.’ Pockets for exploration, free choice, hands on, local culture…. #gls7 #
  • NOT alternate reality, augmented reality, or online games (which tend to stagnate). RATHER games that embedded into exhibits. #gls7 #
  • Intersection of design–>games–>museum–>play #gls7 #
  • On designing games and play for museum contexts (Chu, UW-Madison) #gls7 #
  • audience engagement vs. disciplinary content (tension) requires frame negotiation in design #gls7 #
  • Letting context feed rather than hinder practice…interesting concept considering gaming….SIMS vs. Challenge style games. #gls7 #
  • Frame alignment = reducing tensions between artists and learner experiences. #gls7 #
  • Art Frame (artists experience) vs. Exhibit frame (learner experience) #gls7 #
  • Framing = “what is going on here” – concept more often applied in science, applied to art, #gls7 #
  • Tough Art program – artists design art that can withstand hands on nature of a children’s museum… #
  • Design collaboration – contemporary artists and children’s museum…#gls7 #
  • U of Pittsburg presentation (children’s museum) #gls7 #
  • Virtual component meets need to allow players to complete task that are not physically possible. #gls7 #
  • Camp counselors/guides to nudge (promote research skills). #gls7 #
  • Scientist video chats (live) injected expert – apprentice knowledge building #gls7 #
  • Forums utilized to encourage conversation/cooperative problem-solving (asynchronous). #gls7 #
  • Getting “real science” in…data missions incorporate physical evidence identification, documentation. #gls7 #
  • Having a small role for watchers gets MANY MANY more people involved! #gls7 #
  • What is pyramid squashing? Many watchers–>Active…few enthusiasts. Force enthusiasts to rely on help from watchers. #gls7 #
  • Live, active experience = greater complexity with less “maintenance in perpetuity” #gls7 #
  • Game afoot–>pyramid squashing–>real science–>flash games–>EPIC storyline–>anecdotes…all pieces within the WHOLE experience. #gls7 #
  • Game play engages players immediately to cooperate in problem-solving. #gls7 #
  • Goals to promote student self-identification as scientists…#gls7 #
  • MIT/Smithsonian ARG-llike science game. Effort to take the museum out to the WHOLE national audience. #gls7 #
  • Preview “MUSEUMS AT PLAY: GAMES, INTERACTION AND LEARNING” … anyone know the release date? #gls7 #
  • Attending Museums presentation… where I started my career as an educator. Intrigued w/ common ground between libraries and museums. #gls7 #
  • Game labs less expensive than traditional science labs…true. Also, can also pull lab concept into other content areas. #gls7 #
  • Game labs less expensive than traditional science labs…true. Also, can also pull lab concept into other content areas. #
  • Textbooks, along with other books become more game like in the interactive platforms being used via iPad, etc. #gls7 #
  • interesting concept to rate textbooks against same scale we ue to rate games. #gls7#
  • Getting admins on board … Tough to crack due to fear of social nature of gaming (letting go of control). #
  • National report here http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13078#toc#gls7 #
  • Discussion needed (via Constance) regarding distribution (other than traditional school or private sector marketing) #Gls7 #
  • PD support important, but teachers are even crunched for time for that! #
  • Role of assessment…design principles 1) set learning goals, 2) adapt content 3) formative/summative. Games great potential here #Gls7 #
  • Role of games and sims in assessment…research is just beginning (not on pace with tech available) #Gls7 #
  • National Academy “need to simplify” standards to allow for better employment of games and sims #Gls7 #
  • Gaps in evidence a “call to arms” #Gls7 #
  • Sims and games potential greatest in goals of motivation and conceptual understanding…thus far… #Gls7 #
  • Played arcade then came to my daughter’s place to crash for a nap. Motivated for tmrw session #GLS7 and insight from group think! #
  • Ready to start our session on copyright and remix…Hi all #GLS7 #
  • IDEO Design Guide for Teachers available. #GLS7 #
  • Institute of Play – mobile quest workshop – worth a review. #GLS7 #
  • READ “The Art of Game Design” – discusses the core mechanics of gaming. #GLS7#
  • Are there defined game core-mechanics? Read “Game Design Workshop” Tracy Fullerton. #GLS7 #
  • Pen and paper is a good platform of choice for design thinking. Simple. #GLS7 #
  • What is the core mechanic? Not necessarily tech-based, but rather what is the impetus for play? #GLS7 #
  • “Drift Deck” started with cards. New device tool called “serendipiter” uses similar concept to have students drift a city. #GLS7 #
  • What is mobile as a platform? QR code based? Twitter based? Four-square? Physical mobility? #GLS7 #
  • Wht do we mean by game? Fewer restraints will create situated documentaries, simslike non-goal oriented gmes, game features w/o agoal. #GLS7 #
  • Particularly when using a particular software tool #GLS7 #
  • Using a technology platform can create design constraints. #GLS7 #
  • Stakeholder = leveraging options. #GLS7 #
  • Students are unaccustomed to being “stakeholders” in schools.. makes design more difficult #GLS7 #
  • Schools are about perpetuating the system, not about resistance (as a form of civic engagement) or about change? #GLS7 #
  • Do kids design games linearly because they are goal oriented? Classic board game model? #GLS7 #
  • Why do students make conservative choices in game design? Are they mimicking what they know or do they doubt their social capital? #GLS7 #
  • How do you define successful civic engagement? Is there room for failure to engage? #GLS7 #
  • How we explore the boundries of what is acceptable in K-12 design learning? #GLS7 #
  • Because a large # of kids struggle with design learning-the square fillers-do we move towards alternative schls or changing schl? #GLS7 #
  • How do students cope with “freedom?” This is overwhelming. Socialization issue. #GLS7 #
  • Students sometimes resist co-design curriculum…want 2 get back 2 the lesson (i.e. what do you want me to DO next). #GLS7 #
  • Students sometimes resist co-design curriculum…want to get back to the lesson (i.e. what do you want me to DO next). #GLS amp; #
  • “Messing about space” = time for students to figure out what interests them. Co-design curriculum… #GLS7 #
  • School change is difficult because students don’t always buy in either. #
  • Hybrid design teams. Small groups, flow groups, game jams, cross-generational, cross-expert level. CREATE your learning environment 1st #
  • TIP: Model design. Cultivates communities of practice in the classroom. #GLS7 #
  • TIPS: Introduce things already built or broken (or half-built) … improve design. #GLS7 #
  • TIPS: Repeat process on different time scales. Make it design-centric rather than content centric #GLS7 #
  • Perhaps calls for a reiteration of the process…##GLS7 #
  • What do you measure…value of being lost, frustrated, etc. in the design process #GLS7 #
  • Students are very linear (school-like) in their thinking. #GLS7 #
  • Meta-discussion about design should reveal some explicit steps (i..e. design, prototype, etc.)… #GLS7 #
  • Talk about design process on a meta-level with kids! #GLS7 #
  • No perfect design solution…problem-solving model. #GLS7 #
  • Complexity is abt “trade-offs” ..not yes or no. This requires a cross content approach that is difficult to achieve in secondary. #GLS7 #
  • RT @LibraryRemix: In HS we teach the classic pro/con (duality of perspective. Politically critical thought is more complex. #GLS7 #
  • In HS we teach the classic pro/con (duality of perspective. Politically critical thought is more complex. #GLS #
  • Teaching design need to background content and foreground the design process. #GLS7 #
  • Situated Documentary – Designed by going out and immersing yourself in situation and replicate #GLS7 #
  • Design thinking is NOT natural for many students. This also must be taught #GLS7 within a “design environment.” #
  • Students conditioned by school setting to produce something that is “fair and balanced.” Not necessarily done critically. #GLS7 #
  • ?? “If you were to tell this story in one year to other students, how would you design that telling?” #GLS7 Civic Engagement #
  • When we study technology it is often decontextualized…how does this study change when we plant ourselves in context. #GLS7 #
  • Thinking about design … #GLS7 Matthews research documented Madison protests (observation, interview, imaging. #GLS7 #
  • Disconnects between civic engagement and school…. #GLS7 #
  • Some kids participating in multiple ways in Madison protests. #
  • Consider protests in Madison this year….what tools did students use to engage.? FB, Mobile Media (kids not tweeters). #GLS #
  • Design thinking=innovation. #GLS7 #
  • Mobile apps –> learning environments that encourage student game design as a civic activity…learning by design #GLS7 #
  • What does it mean to be “civically” engaged? #GLS7 #
  • Games across content areas … interesting concept considering civic engagement, which is cross-content as a life skill. #
  • Interesting mixup…university instructors, PE teacher/innovator, K-5 tech coordinator, museum curator, MS teacher, library…. GLS#7 #
  • How do learning ecologies support people (regardless of age)… #GLS7 #
  • Roundtables beinging:. Sitting in on Mobile Civic Engagement #GLS7 #
  • Assumptions abt tech as a natural 4 kids – we r assuming skills, when they actually have MINDSET 4 play tht allows 2 explore tech. #GLS7 #
  • Oral History – how can we use technology to engage kids in intergenerational activities that serve the greater community. #GLS7 #
  • Speaking of Angrybirds RT @NicoleJAM: Angry Birds looks to conjure location-based Magic http://tinyurl.com/3zctz59 #GLS7 #
  • School technology to facilitate out-of-school learning! Great concept! Buccaneer Scholars! #GLS7 #
  • If filters r applied to teacher laptops when they are at home. When are they suppose to vet the resources so they can request unblock. #GLS7 #
  • Tech restrictions? Advocate w/ the filtering folks…they categorize evry blog, evry forum. Need toautomate requests for unblocking. #GLS7 #
  • Mting schools (iteachers) where they are at as we attempt to infuse technology into the curr. is still a TEACHER centered approach. #GLS7 #
  • TECH TAXONOMY in schools – 4) Use technology to help students learn in ways they never have before…redesign their own education. #GLS7 #
  • Gaming club…not just playing but designing infrastructure, service learning (intergenerational), etc. #GLS7 #
  • TECH TAXONOMY in schools – 3) enhancing existing instruction … careful, too often reinforces teacher centered instruciton #GLS7 #
  • TECH TAXONOMY in schools – 2) communication – relates to instruction as it builds community. Meet students WHERE THEY ARE! #GLS7 #
  • TECH TAXONOMY in schools – 1)administration – doesn’t directly relate to instruction. #GLS7 #
  • Shabazz (ECAP) a zero budget class, relying on donations. #GLS7 #
  • ECAP (Equity in Computer Access Program) – curriculum develops technical skills; end product = refurbished computers for schools. #
  • Service learning enriches a community…moving what you learn in one venue to another. #GLS7 #
  • Generation gaps…why do these seem so more pronounced in institutional schooling? #GLS7 #
  • Twitter announcements at school – ideal! No more wasted time “ignoring” the loud speaker. #GLS7 #
  • Here we go….#GLS7 #
  • Just uploaded ‘Visual literacy’ to SlideShare. http://slidesha.re/ki1tQT #
  • And yes…I’m back! Summer went FAST! #
  • Great concept…and ideas for teaching needed tech/media skills when tech resources are limited! http://t.co/bedF8Wt#
  • A literacy coach…librarian…in a new age of immersive technology where students can read AND write texts to learn by…MEdia. #

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Teaching Word Choice in the Library

December 7th, 2011 llcowell Posted in uncategorized | No Comments »

Check out Eloquent Silence, posted last Saturday on Shaun Usher’s Lists of Note. This is a beautiful example of the complexity and art of word choice that more students need to have time learning and practicing. There was a time when, as library media specialists, we regularly taught the thesaurus, helping students to navigate through keywords and indices. Search engines have diminished shortened the navigational learning curve, and generally we’ve tucked little lessons on specific resource types into our archives, rarely pulling them out within the scope of teaching information research. I wonder, though, if we are missing an opportunity here.  Teaching students word choice is more than a writing skill.  Focusing in on synonyms and antonyms–those thesaurus skills–broaden’s their search scope.  Teaches them that in a largely unorganized and certainly uncataloged web of open information, different contributors will classifiy and refer to a topic in a myraid of ways.  Being able to identify related keywords may be all the difference there is between finding some information and finding the best information.

Below are a few online thesaurus worth our time considering…how can we incorporate these into our lessons?

  • Have students cut-and-paste in text from a found resource into the VocabGrabber in order to expand their search to related subjects. Cut and paste text into this tool and it generates an analysis that includes a useful list of vocabulary along with how those words are used in context.  Select a word on the list and a snapshot of that word will pop up in the Visual Thesaurus, along with definitions and sample uses.
  • Help students understand how choice of keyword can drive (and even bias) research by using WordNet, a scholarly
    “lexical database for the English language.” Word Net groups words into sets of synonyms  along with short, general definitions, enabling text analysis and artificial intelligence applications by professional researchers. However, the resulting dictionary and thesaurus are more intuitive for many users.  Two projects stemming from the research will be helpful to your students:

Snappy Words
Based on WordNet, Snappy Words is a free online visual dictionary/thesaurus that clearly and visually denotes ALOT of information about the word and it’s association to other words.

WordVis
Also built on Wordnet, WordVis is meant “for exploring synonyms in a flexible web of words & meanings.

  • Encourage students to explore language more widely by providing ways for them to connect the slang they encounter outside of school to a broader vocabulary.   “The Double-tongued Dictionary records undocumented or under-documented words from the fringes of English, with a focus on slang, jargon, and new words. This site strives to record terms and expressions that are absent from, or are poorly covered in, mainstream dictionaries.”
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Curate! But how?

September 7th, 2011 llcowell Posted in uncategorized | No Comments »

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Stream it…

May 18th, 2011 llcowell Posted in uncategorized | No Comments »

Students reading Slaughterhouse Five. Several need audio support. Online streaming files are an interesting option, assuming internet connectivity. This selection is from the Internet Archives Community Audio collection.  Listen here:

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Testing “Blogsy” for iPad

May 13th, 2011 llcowell Posted in Apps | No Comments »

Downloaded Blogsy on my iPad in anticipation of summer weeks on the beach away from school and computers. The learning curve isn’t too steep.

Adding pictures and video is is a piece of cake using the built in browser and connections to Flickr and YouTube. I especially love the intuitive way it let’s you browse your own collections…both uploaded and “favorites.”. Aligning the image within text is a bit buggy. Seems to only allow for stacked images, though the settings imply otherwise. Updating posts is counterintuitive…and for now, I’m not seeing a way to sent trackbacks.

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Meet Me Online

April 12th, 2011 llcowell Posted in uncategorized | No Comments »

I’ve followed the School Library Journal’s column, Carrie on Copyright, for a long time, generally reading it as each issue comes out.  I had recently added it to my Google Reader feed, as I use this feed to gather information for “tweeting.”  I find it surprising that Carrie Russell, who writes this regular column, does not use Twitter (at least openly) to propogate her column to a wider audience.  It speaks to a general misunderstanding about what Twitter is best used for, in an educational sense.

As @LibraryRemix, on twitter, I use the service to push links to my own blog out to other library media and ed tech specilists, as well as share links to resources I’ve discovered online.  My early foray into the system, where I shared cryptic thoughts and opinions gained me few followers.  In was when I started to share USEFUL information, along with links to longer commentaries in my blog that I started to develop a professional network.  Twitter is at it’s best when used as a BRIDGE medium.

In the classroom, I think students gain significantly when they make a personal connection to experts/authors.  Too often students fail to see themselves as partners in the professional dialogue that surrounds them in their studies.  By connecting directly to the key players in that dialogue, students are encouraged to not only listen in, but to also participate in that dialogue.  Following an expert on twitter, exchanging emails with an author/artist, following a researcher’s blog…each has the potential to help the student become more participatory—practitioners, so to speak—in the learning process.  They become part of the professional network. 

As a teacher, I feel I can be most effective in teaching this professional networking by  modelling both its practice and its benefits.  I find it FRUSTRATING beyond belief that while I can do this as an individual through my LibraryRemix blog/twitter account/facebook page, I cannot do so directly as the Library Media Specialist at my school through the school’s channels.  I can teach students RSS feeds, though those feeds often come from professional blogs, which are blocked by our school’s filters.  Meeting students WHERE they are with the resources that the need…modelling positive learning behaviors in online spaces that are so often seen as only social in nature…that is my professional role and I feel held back by policies that are designed more to prevent than to prepare students for the world they encounter online.   How can it be that students are encouraged to follow outside experts but not the experts in their midst? 

If I could, I’d take my work with students online to the networks where they “live.” There, I’d teach students to find and experts online…and to evalute, to carefully choose who they follow based on reputation, purpose, and credibility.  As it is, I can only point them to the experts I have, myself, vetted…doing the most critical thinking for them.   And, leaving them unprepared to create a learning network beyond the one that they are fed or chance upon.

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The Changing Nature of Copyright

April 2nd, 2011 llcowell Posted in copyright | No Comments »

Presented copyright training for teachers embarking on the development of online or blended classrooms at our school. Teachers have always been frustrated by the limits placed on education and the complexity of the Fair Use Doctrine. Try to inform them how these responsibilities will impact their ability to share information via our Moodle courseware system raises questions and escalates trepidation about the virtual classroom. Shared the following links…just to keep the noise going. As educators, we are ethically bound to adhere to the established law, but we also have a responsibility to enter into the dialogue as it impacts education and how we teach, today.

The Cognitive Science Explanation For Why Copyright Doesn’t Make Much Sense

CITATION: Tech Dirt (2011). The Cognitive Science Explanation For Why Copyright Doesn’t Make Much Sense. Available at: http://www.techdirt.com.

The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education

ATTRIBUTED TO: The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education, Center for Social Media. Available at: http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org.

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for OpenCourseWare

ATTRIBUTED TO: Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in OpenCourseWare 2009 by A Committee of Practitioners of OpenCourseWare in the United States. Available at: http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org.

A Fair y Use Tale

CITATION: Faden, E. A Fair y Tale. Media Education Foundation. Licensed under the Creative Commons and available at: http://www.youtube.com.

Repackaging for the 21 st Century: Teaching Copyright and Computer Ethics in Teacher Education Courses

CITATION: Swain, C., & Gilmore, E. (2001). Repackaging for the 21st century: Teaching copyright and computer ethics in teacher education courses. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education [Online serial] , 1 (4) . Available: http://www.citejournal.org/vol1/iss4/currentpractice/article1.htm

Remix Culture Vs. Copyright Protection: What’s Best for Dance?

CITATION: Fox, D. (2009). Remix Culture Vs. Copyright Protection: What’s Best for Dance? Great Dance. http://greatdance.com/thekineticinterface/2009/03/remix-copyright-dance/

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The Evolution of Copyright

March 22nd, 2011 llcowell Posted in copyright | 1 Comment »

Invention of Movable Type, 1436

Reproduction of previously scarce books initiates concern about the property writes of authors and publishers.

Statute of Anne, 1710

England enacts first copyright law.

U.S. Copyright Act of 1790

Grants 14 year copyrights, with 14 year renewals.  First copyright entered for The Philadelphia Spelling Book by John Barry.

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1802

Prints added to protected works.

General Revision, U.S Copyright Act, 1831

Extended copyrights to 28 years, with 14 year renewals, include music.

Fair Use Doctrine , 1841

Concept of “fair use” first applied to the Copyright Act allowing some copying for educational and critical purposes (news, analysis, research).

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1856

Dramatic compositions added to protected works.

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1865

Photographs and photographic negatives added to protected works.

General Revision, U.S. Copyright Act, 1870

Works of art added to protected works. Right to create certain derivative works reserved for author, including translations and dramatizations.

Establishment of foreign copyright relations, 1891

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1897

Music protected against unauthorized public performance.

General Revision, U.S Copyright Act of 1909

Extends renewals to 28 years.  Recognizes copyrights to new mediums and certain unpublished works.

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1912

Motion pictures, previously registered as photographs, added to classes of protected works.

Title 17 of the U.S. Code, 1947

Codifies copyright law.

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1953

Recording and performing rights extended to nondramatic literary works.

Universal Copyright Convention (Geneva), 1955

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1972

Limited copyright protection extended to sound recordings first published on or after this date.

General Revision, U.S Copyright Act of 1976

Extends copyright to 75 years or life of author+50 years, protects unpublished works, extends protection to new mediums and technologies and formalizes the fair use doctrine by identifying a four-part judicial test.

Amendment to Copyright Act, 1980

Copyright law amended regarding computer programs.

Visual Artists Rights Act, 1990

Extended protection to visual arts and architectural works.

Copyright Renewal Act of 1992

Eliminates need for formal renewal of copyright.

Digital Audio Home Recording Act, 1992

Protections required for digital audio recordings and clarified the legality of home taping of analog and digital sound recordings for private, non-commercial use.

No Electronic Theft Act, 1997

Set penalties for willfully infringing a copyright for purposes of commercial or private financial gain or by reproducing or distributing.

Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (DMCA)

Created tight boundaries around the reproduction of works on the web.  Essentially nullified the “fair use” doctrine within the digital environment.

Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998

Extended terms to 95/120 years or author’s life+70

TEACH Act of 2002 (Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization)

Provided more flexibility in the reproduction of materials to be used in online classes within closed “course management systems” (apart from the public web).  Essentially restored the “fair use” doctrine within the digital environment.

Artists’ Rights and Theft Preservation Act, 2005

Allowed for preregistration of certain works being prepared for commercial distribution.

 

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